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Purple Primula Flower


Purple Primula Flower

Primula


Primula takes its name from Italian «for spring primavera” and is the type genus for the primrose (Primulaceae) family, that is mainly from Northern Hemisphere temperate zone. This type consists of about 400 species of perennials. The name is appropriate for these harbingers of spring that can be found in winter and early spring brightening woodlands, rockeries, and annual beds. Most of the primulas have basal rosette foliage sometimes heavily veined leaves or downy leaves. Depending on the species the stems can have different height from 1-2 in (2.5-5 cm) to over 3 ft (0.9 m) that comes from the center of the rosette and has 5-petalled flowers that can be of different colors. Primulas don’t play a great role in herbal medicines but should not be confused with evening primrose (Oenothera species).


Top Tip

While there are
primroses suited
to many different
applications and
garden conditions,
they all appreciate
the establishment of a regular watering routine.

Cultivation


Primulas mostly grow at home and prefer well-drained, dappled light and cool, moist, humus-rich soil. Some of them prefer wetter conditions, these are bog or candelabra primroses. Primulas propagate by division of well-established clumps when dormant or from seed.


Division


Regular division keeps cultivars of R vulgaris and Polyanthus primroses healthy but can weaken other species. Pull apart fibrous-rooted clumps into single, rooted crowns or rosettes. Divide species with woody rootstocks such as Primula allionii with a knife. Pot alpines, or replant larger divisions, to grow on. Cut back by half the large leaved types, such as bog primroses and candelabras, to reduce moisture loss.


Seeds


All species may be raised from seeds. Seed-raised primroses have the advantage of being virus-free, but some garden species, especially P elatior, P. veris, P. vulgaris, and candelabra types, hybridize readily unless isolated. In general, seeds are set only if both pin eyed (long style, short stamens) and thrum-eyed (short style, long stamens) plants of the species are grown. The seeds arc short-lived so are best sown fresh, but seeds may be sown in spring at 59°F (15°C). For most primroses, a moist, organic-rich, yet free-draining soil mix is ideal.


Name

Flower color

Blooming Season

Flower Fragrance

Plant Height

Plant Width

Hardiness Zone

Frost Tolerance

Primula auricular

Various

Spring to mid-summer

Yes

3-8 in
8-20 cm

6-16 in
15-40 cm

3-9

Yes

Primula denticulate

Pink to purple

Early to mid-spring

No

12 in
30 cm

10-18 in
25-40 cm

6-9

Yes

Primula forrestii

Bright yellow

Spring to summer

No

24 in
60 cm

18 in
45 cm

6-9

Yes

Primula Inverewe

Bright orange – red

Spring to summer

No

24-36 in
60-90 cm

12-20 in
30-50 cm

6-9

Yes

Primula sieboldii

White, Pink, Purple

Spring to early summer

No

12 in
30 cm

12-24 in
30-60 cm

5-9

Yes

Primula, Pruhonicensis Hybrid

Various

Spring to summer

No

4-12 in
10-30 cm

6-16 in
15-40 cm

7-9

Yes