Welcome to World Of Purple Flowers


www.Purple-Flowers-Guide.com




Purple Flowers



Purple Viola Flower


Purple Viola Flower

Viola


Viola is almost worldwide distributed and is presented by about 500 species of annuals, perennials and belongs the violet (Violaceae) family. They are known as violets, pansies, and heartsease, most of them are small clumps of lobed, elliptical, kidney- or heart-shaped leaves with sometimes sweetly scented 5-petalled flowers, their lower petal often bears darker markings The predominant flower colors are: white, yellow and purple, but cultivated flower can be of different colors and shades. Violet fragrance for a long time was widely used in perfume industry, but now synthetics have largely replaced natural oil, because of (45 kg – 100 lb) of flowers is produced only (30 ml) of essence.


Top Tip

Violas are very useful
in the garden,
making excellent
accent plants,
ground covers,
mass plantings,
borders, and container
plants.

Cultivation


Most violets are woodland plants and very adaptable, but anyway they prefer semi- shade and moist humus-rich soil, though the alpines need a little more grit, all of them prefer sunny places. Violets propagate from seed, by division, or from basal cuttings and it depends on the growth form. Perennials in this genus are sometimes short-lived, but most of them are fairly easy to propagate.


Division


Divide clumps of V. odorata after flowering in early spring. Pull apart Viola cultivars into 2 - 4 pieces. Matforming species such as V riviniana are easily divided, they flower the same year if split in autumn or late winter.


Seeds


Sow seeds of most species in early to MindSpring and keep at 59°F (15°C). Sow winter-flowering pansies in midsummer. Seedlings should appear in 10-14 days; transplant when large enough to handle. Stem less alpines such as V. jooi arc best left in the seed pans until the following spring, then are fully transplanted. Some species self-sow and hybridize freely. Many violets set viable seeds from insignificant (clcistogamic), greenish flowers, which never open.


Cuttings


Named cultivars may be sterile but root well from l - 2 in (2.5-5cm) stem-tip cuttings. During flowering, stems of pansy and viola cultivars elongate and become hollow and stem cuttings will not root, so take cuttings in spring from new shoots. Insert them in equal parts of sharp sand and soil at 59°F (15°C); they will root within 14 days. Pol once they show renewed leaf growth. Alternatively, three weeks before taking cuttings in autumn, cut back plants and take stem-tip cuttings from the regrowth. Keep rooted cuttings frost-free with good light over winter.


Mounding


Species may also be top-dressed with gritty soil mix, or mounded, to encourage the stems to root. These rooted stems may then be detached, potted and grown on as for cuttings.



Name

Flower color

Blooming Season

Flower Fragrance

Plant Height

Plant Width

Hardiness Zone

Frost Tolerance

Viola “banner Violet ”

Purple and black

Summer

No

6-12 in
15-30 cm

8-16 in
20-40 cm

7-10

Yes

Viola cornuta

Violet

Late spring to summer

No

6-12 in
15-30 cm

8-15 in
20-38 cm

7-10

Yes

Viola ‘Crystal Bowl True Blue’

Violet-blue

Spring to autumn

No

5-12 in
12-30 cm

8-12 in
20- 30 cm

7-10

Yes

Viola ‘Joker Poker Face’

Orange, Purple and black

Early spring to early summer

No

6-8 in
15-20 cm

8 in
20 cm

7-10

Yes

Viola pedata

Orange

Spring

No

2-6 in
5-15 cm

4-8 in
10 – 20 cm

7-10

Yes

Viola ‘Ultima Baron Red’

Deep red and yellow

Summer

No

6-8 in
15-20 cm

8 in
20 cm

7-10

Yes